Category: General
Posted by: khanti
I know... I'm a bad blogger. Not updating in three months and promising in that post that I would post more regularly. So here's a quick update on what's been happening.

As far as Buddhism goes, I've been struggling a little. The more I learn about the Tibetian traditions, the more interested I am from a sociological standpoint, but the more turned off I am from a spiritual perspective. It's very very interesting, but I'm finding that it's not really for me. So I've been leaning more toward Zen or certain Theravadan traditions, but am feeling a little lost. Thus the lack of posts on these topics. I have too many thoughts swirling around my head to post anything coherent that would still make sense to me in a few months time.

As for my handful of technology posts, I'm realizing that there are a thousand blogs that do a better job of it than I. So if I solve a problem that is under-reported online, I may post it here, as I do see a few folks winding up here from Google searches for the Reporting Services kill-bit issue, but on the whole, I'll not be posting much along those lines.

On other fronts, I've not been hiking too much lately. Partly due to weather, partly due to schedule conflicts and such, but I miss it terribly. Winter is officially here and I'm hoping to get out and winter camp and showshoe a bunch. I'd also like to pick up cross-country skiing again. It's been a long time since I've done it, but I like the idea of backcountry cross-country skiing. We'll see how it shapes up.

Anyhow, that's the state of things. I'm not going to promise more regular updates, as I'd be sure to break that promise. So, for the handful of people who may read this, so long for now.

Posted at 10:42:43 central time.

Category: General
Posted by: khanti
As I posted early in the summer, the number of updates has diminished as life got busy during the warm weather. It's still warm out, but life is settling down a little and I wanted to take a few minutes to post some random stuff that's been floating around my head lately.

To begin with, my first ever gardening attempt was a modest success! I started several varieties of peppers and tomatoes from seed this spring. I went back and forth on whether or not to give it a try this year, and as a result, I started a little later than I should have. As a result I rushed the construction of the beds and didn't get the soil conditioned right, and my yields suffered. I chose to try the "Square Foot Gardening" method and built two raised beds in the back yard, each about 2'x6', with removable chicken-wire fence around each as I have lots of bunnies and chipmunks in my yard that would have a feast otherwise. Early on, my cat knocked the seedlings off the windowsill when they were a couple of weeks old. Many didn't make it and the ones that did were all mixed up so I lost track of what was what. I planted the heartiest looking seedlings and I wound up with nothing but tomatoes, but two different varieties: an heirloom "Yellow Perfection" and a red beefsteak (such an unfortunate name). Of those 16 plants, about half are producing tomatoes and I've been getting 4-5 every couple days for a few weeks now. Between that and the huge boxes I've been getting from my CSA every week, I'm swimming in vegetables. I want to learn how to preserve/can vegetables, but for now I've been cooking up a lot of stews and chilis, eating what I can and freezing the extras. I'm also using my dehydrator to dry a lot of the herbs and tomatoes. Next year, I hope to get serious about food preservation and want to use the local farmers market, my garden and the CSA to stock up my pantry for the winter, so I'm not eating so many 'imported' fresh food and commercially canned foods. I've eaten better this season than I probably ever have and it feels great to know that I'm both doing it myself and supporting local agriculture.

On another note, I've been hiking. I spent four days in Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore over Labor Day weekend. It was my second time there, but this time we hiked the full length of the park and I'm just as in love with the place now as I was last year when I first laid eyes on it. It is a place of such supreme beauty, it defies description. Here's a few samples:
From 2009 - 9/4-9/7 Pictured Rocks

From 2009 - 9/4-9/7 Pictured Rocks

From 2009 - 9/4-9/7 Pictured Rocks


I'm working on some new posts and hope to get back into the swing of weekly+ postings soon.

Thanks for reading!

Posted at 21:02:19 central time.

Category: Backpacking
Posted by: khanti
I've long been absent, I know... I've been backpacking out west on the Tahoe Rim Trail and then getting back into the swing of things here at home. I'll be posting more in the coming weeks, but in the meantime, here is a link to the journal I kept on the trip.

khanti's TRT Trailjournal

Posted at 06:47:33 central time.

Category: Buddhism
Posted by: khanti
Ethical Conduct Ľ Right Livelihood
samyag-ājīva Ľ amyak-karmānta

Right livelihood means that one should earn one's living in a righteous way and that wealth should be gained legally and peacefully. The Buddha mentions four specific activities that harm other beings and that one should avoid for this reason: 1. dealing in weapons, 2. dealing in living beings (including raising animals for slaughter as well as slave trade and prostitution), 3. working in meat production and butchery, and 4. selling intoxicants and poisons, such as alcohol and drugs. Furthermore any other occupation that would violate the principles of right speech and right action should be avoided. (via The Big View)

Considering what I do, I LOVE my job. I put in that 'considering' qualifier because I'm not convinced that the career I'm in will be career I always do. I'd like to mix things up someday and try teaching or some other line of work, perhaps overseas. I do love my job, though. The people I work with are great, the company seems to truly care for the employees, we're financially stable in tough economic times, I have interesting work to do, and they compensate me fairly for it. I really can't complain. However, I wonder sometimes about how the work I do may violate this step in the path.

The four examples given don't apply to me, but the caveat about occupations that could violate the principle of right action has left me a little befuddled. The company I work for is involved in the jewelry industry. There's nothing wrong with jewelry, per se, but I wonder about the environmental and social consequences of the production of the raw materials of the jewelry trade. Everyone has heard about "blood diamonds", but mining itself has a ton of negative environmental consequences from cyanide-laced leachate from tailings of gold mines to sulfide mining to open-pit diamond mining and the associated erosion and so on. The fact that most mines are in underdeveloped countries means that, with some notable exceptions, the human tragedy of this resource exploitation is staggering. How can I, as a practicing lay Buddhist, reconcile these facts with my livelihood? I have a hard time with it. My company is not directly involved in the mining, manufacture or sale of jewelry, we're in the insurance business, but we're involved enough that it makes my conscience twinge a little.

My mental jury is still out, though. I work with great people who have the best of intentions and any harm done is several layers of transactions removed from what I do, but I struggle with the connection, none-the-less. The industry has done a lot to clean up its image over the last decade or so. I hope that the work being done there is primarily in real effort and not just in marketing. But if the recent sulfide mining debate in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is any indication, then I suspect that greed is the motivating factor nine times out of ten and I'm going to continue to struggle.

Posted at 20:22:01 central time.

Category: Buddhism
Posted by: khanti
Ethical Conduct : Right Action
Śīla : amyak-karmānta

The second ethical principle, right action, involves the body as natural means of expression, as it refers to deeds that involve bodily actions. Unwholesome actions lead to unsound states of mind, while wholesome actions lead to sound states of mind. Again, the principle is explained in terms of abstinence: right action means 1. to abstain from harming sentient beings, especially to abstain from taking life (including suicide) and doing harm intentionally or delinquently, 2. to abstain from taking what is not given, which includes stealing, robbery, fraud, deceitfulness, and dishonesty, and 3. to abstain from sexual misconduct. Positively formulated, right action means to act kindly and compassionately, to be honest, to respect the belongings of others, and to keep sexual relationships harmless to others. Further details regarding the concrete meaning of right action can be found in the Precepts. (From The Big View)

This principle reminds me of a Kahlil Gibran quote I encountered recently: "If the other person injures you, you may forget the injury; but if you injure him you will always remember." A person who has incorporated the previous principles into their lives will find it difficult to forget harm caused to others, leading to an unsound state of mind. A person who's actions are wholesome has little to worry about since in not harming anyone, they will generate nothing but goodwill from the people they encounter. The first explanation above talks about causing harm to come to sentient beings. I've talked extensively about this in previous posts as it regards my decision to stop consuming animal products, but it brings up another point, that of suicide. I can't help but think of a situation where one would have to likely sacrifice one's own life in order to save others. I would think that this would still be considered right action even though the result was essentially suicide, as the good caused by saving others outweighs the negative of what is essentially suicide. The second explanation speaks to the classics of lying, cheating and stealing. These seem pretty self evident. The third talks about sexual misconduct. This gets a little thornier as the times have changed a great deal since the time the sutras were written. Ultimately, though, it all comes down to not causing harm. Sexual and relationship issues, though, are pretty darn complicated. For instance, let's say Guy A is interested in Gal B, but Guy C is also. If Guy A and Gal B "hook up", that causes harm to come to Guy C, does it not? Does the good generated by the mutually consensual relations between Guy A and Gal B outweigh the harm caused to Guy C? It all makes my head spin and reminds be of a cartoon I saw recently

XKCD Comic

Posted at 10:18:26 central time.

Category: Backpacking
Posted by: khanti
My apologies for my extended absence, I've been busy enjoying summer in Wisconsin!

First, I spent 6 days and 5 nights backpacking at Isle Royale National Park. It's a large island (45mi x 12mi) in Lake Superior near Thunder Bay, Ontario. It's famous for having large populations of both wolves and moose, while having no white tail deer, elk or bear. So, ecologically, it's pretty unique and has been studied intensely. The wolves and moose did not arrive on the island until the 1940s when they came across the ice during a particularly cold winter. It's also well known for it's history of copper mining and resorts. Now, it's maintained as mostly wilderness by the National Park Service. It's accessible by ferry from Houghton or Copper Harbor Michigan or from Grand Portage Minnesota. We took the ferry, the 60' Voyageur II, from Grand Portage, a 2 1/2 hour ride on very bumpy seas to Windigo on the western end of the island and took 5 days to walk to Rock Harbor on the eastern end of the island via the Minong Ridge, Indian Portage, Greenstone Ridge, and Tobin Harbor trails (and a few cross trails). We saw several moose, a red fox, lots of snowshoe hare and many other critters, but the highlight was a very brief glimpse of a wolf. It was running down the trail ahead of us and I caught a brief look at it before it rounded a corner and was gone. All in all, a wonderful trip to a truly magical place. Nearly 60 miles of hiking and never once crossed a road and we saw maybe a couple dozen people the entire time. I'll be going back for certain.

Some photos...

Moose
From 2009 5/26-5/21 Isle Royale


Fairly typical trail along the Minong Ridge
From 2009 5/26-5/21 Isle Royale


Lake Superior from Todd Harbor
From 2009 5/26-5/21 Isle Royale


Sunset at Todd Harbor
From 2009 5/26-5/21 Isle Royale


Me on Mt Franklin
From 2009 5/26-5/21 Isle Royale


Ahhhhh... we made it to Rock Harbor
From 2009 5/26-5/21 Isle Royale


and a couple videos ...

Minong Ridge Trail east of North Lake Desore


Greenstone Ridge Trail between Mt Ojibway and Mt Franklin


Tobin Harbor Trail

Posted at 08:40:39 central time.

Category: Buddhism
Posted by: khanti
Ethical Conduct : Right Speech
Śīla : samyag-vāc

Right speech is the first principle of ethical conduct in the eightfold path. Ethical conduct is viewed as a guideline to moral discipline, which supports the other principles of the path. This aspect is not self-sufficient, however, essential, because mental purification can only be achieved through the cultivation of ethical conduct. The importance of speech in the context of Buddhist ethics is obvious: words can break or save lives, make enemies or friends, start war or create peace. Buddha explained right speech as follows: 1. to abstain from false speech, especially not to tell deliberate lies and not to speak deceitfully, 2. to abstain from slanderous speech and not to use words maliciously against others, 3. to abstain from harsh words that offend or hurt others, and 4. to abstain from idle chatter that lacks purpose or depth. Positively phrased, this means to tell the truth, to speak friendly, warm, and gently and to talk only when necessary. (From The Big View)

The Buddha's explanation of right speech, as highlighted above, seems pretty straightforward. Don't lie, don't say bad things about people, don't say hateful things and speak only when it means something. In principle, I agree with the first three. The fourth, though, I have to only partially agree with. I'm not a particularly talkative person, and I try to be conscious of the meaning of the words I do use, but "idle chatter", when not in conflict with the first three principles, can still be a very useful tool. The friendly banter among friends, the pleasantries exchanged with a co-worker around the coffee station, the shared dreams and "sweet nothings" exchanged between lovers, and the news of relations shared among family... These are some of the things that build and sustain close personal ties with people. However, when this idle chatter is done insincerely, without any sense of presence, or with self-serving motivations, then I absolutely agree that it is undesirable. Anything, done mindfully, and with the right intention can be positive. I wonder, then, if this kind of talking, done mindfully, that has no deeper meaning other than to build relationships with people, is then considered "idle chatter"? Does this still violate the intent of this principle? I think not, but that's my gut/heart talking. Doing a little research, I've been unable to find any guidance. I'm sure it's out there and if I turn anything up, I'll be sure to post a followup. If any of my handful of readers have an opinion, I'd love to hear from you, feel free to leave a comment.

Posted at 20:42:38 central time.

Category: General
Posted by: khanti
I've been very busy lately enjoying the nice spring weather we've been having. Going for long walks, biking to and from work, working in the yard and garden and generally being outside every chance I get. As much as I love living in the frozen north, I do love spring. I think what I love about living here is that all four seasons are here in all their glory. The summers are hot, the winters are cold and spring and fall are beautifully in-between.

Between all this being outdoors and preparing for my upcoming backpacking trip, I haven't had much time to write. I'm new to this blogging thing, and I suspect this will be typical, where regular posts will be a wintertime activity. I don't expect to cease entirely during the warmer months, just that I'll find time less often. But seeing as how days can go by between visitors here, I don't suspect I'm disappointing anyone besides myself :-)

Posted at 21:04:39 central time.

Category: Buddhism
Posted by: khanti
Sorry for my lack of updates lately. Things have been pretty chaotic. However, I read a blog post elsewhere today that really struck a chord with me. While my flirtations with Buddhism have spanned a couple of decades now, just as the author (Julia May Jonas) suggests, I'm like many 21st century Buddhists in that I finally converted while attempting to recover from a bad relationship (divorce in my case) and am now struggling in the beginnings of a new romance. So this post really spoke to me. Enjoy.

Posted at 21:29:50 central time.

Category: General
Posted by: khanti
I've been selected to be filmed for a series of documentary short profiles on vegans around the country. I'm nervous as heck about the whole thing, but figure it's worth it if I can help inspire other folks to consider a cruelty-free lifestyle. I'm not sure why I was selected. In fact, originally I wasn't. I didn't make the final round of selection, but apparently, the guy they were going to interview in Milwaukee is no longer vegan and is just vegetarian now, so he was 'disqualified', so since I'm in the area and was a 'runner-up', I guess, I'm on deck. Perhaps it was the fact that I used to hunt that piqued their curiosity about me? I dunno. Anyhow, click the logo below to learn more.

Vegan Documentary

Posted at 21:05:35 central time.

Category: Buddhism
Posted by: khanti
Wisdom : Right Intention
Praj˝ā : samyak-saṃkalpa

While right view refers to the cognitive aspect of wisdom, right intention refers to the volitional aspect, i.e. the kind of mental energy that controls our actions. Right intention can be described best as commitment to ethical and mental self-improvement. Buddha distinguishes three types of right intentions: 1. the intention of renunciation, which means resistance to the pull of desire, 2. the intention of good will, meaning resistance to feelings of anger and aversion, and 3. the intention of harmlessness, meaning not to think or act cruelly, violently, or aggressively, and to develop compassion. (From The Big View)

I like this definition of Right Intention as "The mental energy that controls our actions" and "commitment to ethical and mental self-improvement". It's all about your state of mind and your attitude towards the world around you. I just recently watched the 'movie' "The Secret". While its hocus-pocus explanations for things and its focus on material wealth was pretty disturbing to me (seeming to indirectly encourage rampant consumerism), one message in the film made sense in light light of Right intention... What you think will manifest itself in your life in unexpected ways. While my criticisms of the details of the film are many, this is fundamentally true. The Buddha is said to have stated "The mind is everything. What you think, you become." So to think compassionately, to be thankful, to intend no harm, all of these things become you. If you cultivate these thoughts, they will begin to drive your actions and the universe will respond in kind.

This is also a large factor in my decision to be vegan. Compassion and cruelty to any sentient being (animals included, directly or indirectly) are fundamentally incompatible. Beginning to cultivate a sense of good will in all that I do has had a transformative effect on my health, both physical and emotional, and my dietary decisions have been a large part of that lately. I can look my cat in the eye and not be haunted by the other animals that would have suffered were I to continue to have the harmful intentions manifest in decisions regarding diet.

Posted at 21:11:36 central time.

Category: General
Posted by: khanti
"Creating your own blog is about as easy as creating your own urine, and you're about as likely to find someone else interested in it." -- Lore Sj÷berg

Posted at 18:16:15 central time.

Category: General
Posted by: khanti
So, I have a reputation for having a "black thumb". Every plant I've ever touched seems to die and horrible lingering death. But I want to do the right thing by eating mostly locally grown food and even though I've signed up for a local CSA program, I like the idea of growing my own food. My ex-wife has a talent for plants and we did some gardening years ago. I did all the heavy lifting, she did all the plant care and knowing my propensity for killing green things, she never taught me anything and discouraged me from getting too chummy with the plants. So, when I decided to start a vegetable garden on my own this year, I'm pretty much starting from scratch. I bought a copy of "Square Foot Gardening" by Mel Bartholomew and attended a neat gardening seminar last weekend and I'm feeling a little less intimidated. I bought some wood and constructed some frames for raised beds and am pulling together everything I need for the soil (peat moss, compost, vermiculite, worm castings) even started buying some non-hybrid seeds (organically grown of course :-) ). I'm going to have three beds, one 4x4, and two 2 1/2 x 5 1/2. Not too ambitious, I hope. I'm planning to get my leafy greens in the ground by Friday and start some peppers and tomatoes inside (a little late, I know...) tonight. As things progress, I'll post some photos and updates here.

Posted at 07:21:00 central time.

Category: Buddhism
Posted by: khanti
Wisdom : Right View
Praj˝ā : samyag-dṛṣṭi

Right view is the beginning and the end of the path, it simply means to see and to understand things as they really are and to realize the Four Noble Truths. As such, right view is the cognitive aspect of wisdom. It means to see things through, to grasp the impermanent and imperfect nature of worldly objects and ideas, and to understand the law of karma and karmic conditioning. Right view is not necessarily an intellectual capacity, just as wisdom is not just a matter of intelligence. Instead, right view is attained, sustained, and enhanced through all capacities of mind. It begins with the intuitive insight that all beings are subject to suffering and it ends with complete understanding of the true nature of all things. Since our view of the world forms our thoughts and our actions, right view yields right thoughts and right actions. (From The Big View)

This is where one begins when first studying the dharma. It's the process of studying the basic Buddhist principles. In one sense, you could pick up a textbook on world religions and study up, but as stated in the above quote, it is not just an intellectual exercise. It is something that must be grasped and internalized at every level of being. It's understanding, at a basic, intuitive, and instinctual level. I've heard this step called Right Understanding, and I actually prefer that name, as it better relates this idea.

I tend to over-analyze things and find this level of understanding to be difficult to achieve. I live in my head a little too much sometimes. Fortunately for me, anyhow, there really was no element of faith (in the traditional sense) involved here. The basic teachings of the Buddhadharma just plain makes sense to me. Not that they are easy to grasp, or that I have some perfect understanding of them, I have much work to do in gaining additional insight. It's just that they do not seem in conflict with reason and so I don't have that internal hurdle to leap.

So Right View/Understanding is the idea of looking at the world as it really is. But what is the true nature of reality? Start with the Four Noble Truths, throw in the Natural Law of Karma, stir in equal measures of Dependent Origination and Uncontrolled Rebirth(Samsara), blend in anātman until creamy smooth. Pour onto a hot griddle of Emptiness in 6" cakes and cook until bubbles of Wisdom begin to form, flip over and repeat until golden brown. Presto! Buddhist Worldview Flapjacks.

Posted at 10:13:30 central time.

Posted at 21:45:08 central time.

Category: General
Posted by: khanti
As promised back in January, I'll be soon starting a series on the Eight-fold path. It may be slow in coming as most of what I've been writing lately has been too personal to post here. My apologies to my half-dozen or so readers for the slow down in post frequency. Not everything is for public consumption. Sorry!

Posted at 17:08:48 central time.

Category: Backpacking
Posted by: khanti
Just got back yesterday from a trip to Florida. The first 6 days were for a work-related conference and workshops (see prior blog post). Then I had 3 1/2 days to kill and a full backpack so I went exploring. Thursday evening I left Orlando and drove West to the Withlacoochee State Forest to try to find the trailhead for the Richloam loop and ideally a campground as well as I knew I'd be getting there too late to start hiking. As I got close, I could smell wood-smoke and there were portable highway signs advising of smoke on the roads. I could not find the trailhead in the dark and it was getting late and I was getting tired, so I got a hotel room for the night. Friday morning, since I had the time and I needed a better map, I drove a little out of the way to the headquarters for the state forest and talked to a ranger there. He said that it'd been so dry that about 700 acres of the forest had burned, but that it was now under control, though probably smoldering in places. He gave me a trail map and I went back to find the trailhead. As it turns out, the night before, I thought I was on the wrong road and had U-turned all of 200 yards short of the trailhead! Oh Well. I spoke with another ranger there who said I shouldn't run into any burned areas except on the north loop. I intended to hike counter-clockwise so I'd be doing the south and east loops first and would have a couple more days before I got to the burned areas.

The hike started well. It was kind of hot, but breezy, so I wasn't overheating. The trail was perfectly flat (it is Florida after all) but very pretty. Lots of plants and wildlife I'd never seen much of before, including lots of Armadillos. Within a few miles I was at the Withlacoochee River. As dry as it had been, the river was a green, stagnant swampy mess. It was also the last water I'd see. By the time I got where I could camp, about 14 miles into the day, I had just enough water left for dinner, breakfast and a little for drinking early the second day. I decided that if I didn't find water early in the morning (Saturday), I'd cut back on a side trail to the car and decide what to do. The night was interesting. Having never camped in Florida before, there were night noises I was not familiar with. But I slept reasonably well despite the humidity and the crashing of critters through the brush.

Saturday morning, I hiked on, and did not find any water so I took the 2 1/2 mile cutoff back to the trailhead and decided then that the trail that was left was all in the burnt area, so I decided to hop in the car and head to the coast instead. I spent Saturday night in Hudson, FL at a motel directly across the road from a municipal beach. Sunday was spent driving down the coast and visiting a museum and aquarium south of Tampa. Sunday night I spent in Lakeland and then flew home yesterday. All in all a good trip, though it would have been a lot more fun to do with friends.

Here's some photos/video:





From Florida 2009 3/20-3/30


From Florida 2009 3/20-3/30


From Florida 2009 3/20-3/30

Posted at 13:22:47 central time.

Category: Technology
Posted by: khanti
My apologies for the few posts lately, but I've been at an IT conference out of town and have been very busy. Something struck me today, though, that is worth sharing. It's no secret that there are fewer women in technical fields than men. Information Technology and computers are no exception to this. It really puts it in perspective, though, when you go to one of these conferences. I took a headcount in one representative session today and there were 65 men and 3 women in the room. THREE! There's something seriously wrong with that. Either we men are idiots for choosing this as a career and they've just figured it out before us, or the system is broken. I don't believe there's anything basically wrong with IT, and I think women are just as capable as men in the field, there's just fewer of them. There's no question of the nature/nurture debate here. It's nurture in my opinion. Women simply aren't encouraged to pursue these kinds of fields of study. Partly by friends and family, but most importantly by the educational system. At least that was the case for my generation. I'm not certain if things have changed much lately. Seeing it in these terms over the last few days prompted me to do a little research and I found this little gem here : "The number of women in IT, as measured as a percentage of the total IT personnel pool, declined from 42 percent in 1996 to 32.4 percent in 2004--with no noticeable progress in the number of women in professional or management ranks." So things are getting worse. Great. The study referenced in the article points out that problem is not limited to the US, it's a global phenomenon. But why?

Some seem to think that it's because the profession has been dominated by male 'geeks' for so long, that it causes women to discount it purely by social association as early as their early teens. So maybe it is simply a matter of perception that we're all bleary-eyed geeks sitting in darkened rooms eating pizza and drinking Mountain Dew, who play D&D on our days off and are known to hack out code in 48 hour marathons and compare pocket protectors... As untrue as that stereotype is, it persists and may be a big reason for the lopsided distribution of the sexes. What do YOU think?

Posted at 20:21:19 central time.

Category: Backpacking
Posted by: khanti
I spent this past weekend staying with friends in Phillips, WI and we all took a day trip up to the Ice Caves on Lake Superior near Cornucopia, WI. It was a bright sunny day, 50 degrees and virtually no wind. Since we'd just come out of a cold snap, the ice wasn't nearly as slushy as it could have been under such conditions. Truly, they were the best possible conditions for a visit. Here are a few of my favorite photos from the trip:

A view of the shoreline
From 2009 3/13 - 3/15 Phillips, Ashland & Ice Caves


Birch trees at the top of the cliffs. Love this shot against the blue skies.
From 2009 3/13 - 3/15 Phillips, Ashland & Ice Caves


Patterns in the sandstone cliffs.
From 2009 3/13 - 3/15 Phillips, Ashland & Ice Caves


This is about as bad as the meltwater got. It's actually only an inch or two deep and sitting on top of 2-3 feet of solid ice.
From 2009 3/13 - 3/15 Phillips, Ashland & Ice Caves


Love this column of ice where a spring dripped down over the cliff. Looks like a stalactite/stalagmite in a cave.
From 2009 3/13 - 3/15 Phillips, Ashland & Ice Caves

Posted at 08:53:59 central time.

Posted at 22:06:25 central time.